Your Questions About Fitness

Sharon asks…

How much am I supposed to weigh?

What is the correct weight for a 19 year old female that is around 5’5? And is there any way that I can gain weight? I’ve been 111 for the past three years, and no matter how much I eat, I can’t gain weight. I either stay the same, or lose it. Im four pounds underweight to donate blood but I really want too and I was just wondering what you’re supposed to weigh at my age.

The Expert answers:

First of all is it AWESOME that you want to donate blood. Hooray for you. You are within a healthy weight range for your height and age. You can go to this website which shows healthy body mass index for you. Http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi

I wouldn’t worry about trying to gain weight unless you really feel you are too thin, then the best way to do it is to start lifting weights. You won’t beef up or start to look like a man I promise. But you will build muscle which weighs more than any other tissue and can gain a few “healthy” pounds this way.

Ken asks…

What is the mathematical formula for retrograde extrapolation?

The Expert answers:

The mathematical method propounded by Professor Dr EMP Widmark [1, 2] for estimation of blood alcohol levels from consumption and vice versa has proven robust and continues in general use after the passage of more than seventy years, despite the development of other, arguably more exact, approaches such as that of Watson [3].

Widmark’s “reduced body mass,” or “r” value represents that proportion of the body available for the distribution of alcohol, and is an important part of the calculation. The average “r” values reported by Widmark (male average 0.68, standard deviation 0.085; female average 0.55, standard deviation 0.055) are often used as defaults, but they are open to question on several grounds:

They are based on very small series (20 men and 10 women), so significant statistical variation due to non-random selection is quite possible;
Widmark did not claim that the range of values in his subjects was representative of humans in general; and
Several more modern studies report higher average figures, although the observed ranges generally overlap Widmark’s experimental results [4, 5].
It is an inconvenient fact that the specific Widmark “r” value for an individual can be known with certainty only by experiment, and furthermore that it can change with the passage of time. It is possible, however, to make a reasonable estimate of the “r” value at the time of interest; several methods have been proposed for this. Notable among such methods is that of Forrest [6], which is based upon the Body Mass Index (BMI; weight divided by height squared).

William asks…

How can a weak, skinny girl get in shape?

I’m 14, 5 foot and about 83 lb. I want to get in shape, but I can’t afford to lose weight, I’m already way too thin. However, all the lose no weight yet get buff regimes are things like chin-ups, when to this day I can’t crank out one push-up. How can I get in shape?

The Expert answers:

You do need daily exercise which is necessary to prevent heart disease and, especially for females, to prevent them getting osteoporosis – brittle bone disease – in later life, and to keep you fit and healthy. I suggest you attend an aerobics class to build up your fitness. It concentrates on suppleness, not strength.
You also need to eat fruit or drink fruit juice in between meals to keep your Glycemic Index at a constant level (keep topping up the tank) – hence the 5 a day mantra. This is your blood sugar (glucose) level and provides your energy.
To diet and control weight properly needs some science behind it.
When you eat is just as important as what you eat. Chocolate is best eaten in the morning when you can burn off the calories it gives. If eaten at night when there is likely to be no exercise before going to bed, it will end up as white fat and increase your weight but do it unhealthily. Alcohol consumption is the same and it is best to avoid alcohol if on a diet. Carbohydrates like potatoes and bread are fuels, but will convert to white fat if not used – and this is likely if eaten late of an evening.
Although energetic sports will help you to lose weight, moderate exercise alone will not. The weight loss is usually water which is soon replaced, and it doesn’t burn as many calories as people think. A moderately-loaded exercise cycle ridden at 30 mph only burns around 3 calories per minute and uses 5.6 calories/mile. These figures are not erroneous. As a check: the average 25 year old 5’4” tall woman who weighs 120 lbs. And has a moderately active lifestyle will need 1900 calories all day.(1 day=1440 minutes) That is an average of 1.33 calories/min. The average 25 year old 5’8” tall man who weighs 140 lbs. And has a moderately active lifestyle will need 2280 calories all day. That is an average of 1.6 calories/min.
As someone who has been on a diet and keep fit regime for seven years, my advice is to treat diet as the way to control your weight and leave exercise for keeping fit – you can then forget about calories and just enjoy the exercise. You need to separate the two in your mind.
There are two things you need to know about weight control. The first is how many calories you will need per day.
You are using energy even when you are asleep. BMR is your Basal Metabolic Rate, which is the number of calories you’d burn if you stayed in bed all day. Strangely, if you try a starvation diet to lose weight it will decrease your BMR, making it harder to lose weight and so is counter-productive. BMR decreases with age, making it harder to lose weight as you age but cardiovascular exercises can increase it. I have calculated it for you and it is 1232.25. Now you multiply it by a factor which depends upon how much physical activity you will do in the day. It ranges from 1.2 (sedentary) to 1.9 (very active). This will give you the number of calories you will need.
The second is an assessment of your weight.
For that you need know your Body Mass Index, which is the clinical figure that determines if you are under-, normal-, or overweight. In your case it is 16.2 and the normal range is 18.5 – 24.9, which equates to 95 lbs. – 128 lbs. At your height, so you are quite underweight and need to gain 14 lbs. To put you in the normal range.
If you live in the UK I suggest you contact your local NHS office and speak to a Health Trainer. Knowing your BMR and your BMI will let them give you diet and fitness advice which will help you achieve your objective. They’re the experts and their service is free.
If you live in the US ask the equivalent people at your local Medical Center.

David asks…

Wat is the average weight for a 5’6 athletic 14 yr old girl?

Im 14 and i weigh 120 and im pretty sure its mostly muscle but idk and where is the best place to get pants if ur this body type cause i go to hollister and stuff and i have to wear a size 6 and the butt doesnt rly fit. Thanks!
I have the same problem with ae they fit me around the waste but not around my butt its all loose its so annoyin!

The Expert answers:

That’s average for athletic girl your height and age
http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/
(body mass index (BMI) is a measure of body fat based on
height and weight that applies to both adult men and women)
you can go to that site and calculate your bmi,
and see if your normal

hm, I’m 5’4 and I’m a cheerleader, i was in rugby
I’m very athletic, I’m 15 turning 16
anyways, i shop at American eagle
there jeans are so comfortable
blue-notes has cheep nice jeans,
hollister, i never bought jeans there before, so i don’t
know what there like
old navy has nice jeans but there sizes are screwed up i find
also, west 49 has nice jeans, but there really long
where I’m short i have a lot of extra jean room at the bottom
where your taller you may not have that problem

Robert asks…

From a non-biast point of veiw, is Creatine dangerous? Has it been scientifically prooved that it works?

I have been taking Amplified Creatine 189 for a couple months. I belive that is is working wonderfully. Can results be different for certain people? Has this product been clinically proven to work?

The Expert answers:

Creatine is often taken by athletes as a supplement for those wishing to gain muscle mass (bodybuilding). There are a number of forms but the most common are creatine monohydrate – creatine complexed with a molecule of water, and Creatine ethyl ester (CEE). A number of methods for ingestion exist – as a powder mixed into a drink, or as a capsule or caplet. Once ingested, creatine is highly bioavailable, whether it is ingested as the crystalline monohydrate form, the free form in solution, or even in meat. Creatine salts will become the free form when dissolved in aqueous solution. Conventional wisdom recommends the consumption of creatine with high glycemic index carbohydrates, though research indicates that the use of high GI carbs in combination with protein is also beneficial.[5]

There is scientific evidence that taking creatine supplements can marginally increase athletic performance in high-intensity anaerobic repetitive cycling sprints, but studies in swimmers and runners have been less than promising, most likely because these activities are sustained at a given intensity and thus do not allow for significant intra-exercise synthesis of additional creatine phosphate molecules. Ingesting creatine can increase the level of phosphocreatine in the muscles up to 20%. It must be noted creatine has no significant effect on aerobic endurance, though it will increase power during aerobic exercise.[6]

Since body mass gains of about 1 kg can occur in a week’s time, many studies suggest that the gain is simply due to greater water retention inside the muscle cells. However, studies into the long-term effect of creatine supplementation suggest that body mass gains cannot be explained by increases in intracellular water alone.[7] In the longer term, the increase in total body water is reported to be proportional to the weight gains, which means that the percentage of total body water is not significantly changed. The magnitude of the weight gains during training over a period of several weeks argue against the water-retention theory.

Also, research has shown that creatine increases the activity of satellite cells, which make muscle hypertrophy possible. Creatine supplementation appears to increase the number of myonuclei that satellite cells will ‘donate’ to damaged muscle fibers, which increases the potential for growth of those fibers. This increase in myonuclei probably stems from creatine’s ability to increase levels of the myogenic transcription factor MRF4.[8][9].

In another study, researchers concluded that changes in substrate oxidation may influence the inhibition of fat mass loss associated with creatine after weight training when they discovered that fat mass did not change significantly with creatine but decreased after the placebo trial in a 12-week study on ten active men. The study also showed that 1-RM bench press and total body mass increased after creatine, but not after placebo.[10] The underlying effect of Creatine on body composition if there is indeed one has yet to be determined, as another study with a similar timeframe suggests no effect on body composition, but had less overall emphasis on metabolic effects. [11]

Creatine use is not considered doping and is not banned by the majority of sport-governing bodies. However, in the United States, the NCAA recently ruled that colleges could not provide creatine supplements to their players, though the players are still allowed to obtain and use creatine independently.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Your Questions About Fitness

Richard asks…

How much am I supposed to weigh?

What is the correct weight for a 19 year old female that is around 5’5? And is there any way that I can gain weight? I’ve been 111 for the past three years, and no matter how much I eat, I can’t gain weight. I either stay the same, or lose it. Im four pounds underweight to donate blood but I really want too and I was just wondering what you’re supposed to weigh at my age.

The Expert answers:

First of all is it AWESOME that you want to donate blood. Hooray for you. You are within a healthy weight range for your height and age. You can go to this website which shows healthy body mass index for you. Http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi

I wouldn’t worry about trying to gain weight unless you really feel you are too thin, then the best way to do it is to start lifting weights. You won’t beef up or start to look like a man I promise. But you will build muscle which weighs more than any other tissue and can gain a few “healthy” pounds this way.

Thomas asks…

What is the mathematical formula for retrograde extrapolation?

The Expert answers:

The mathematical method propounded by Professor Dr EMP Widmark [1, 2] for estimation of blood alcohol levels from consumption and vice versa has proven robust and continues in general use after the passage of more than seventy years, despite the development of other, arguably more exact, approaches such as that of Watson [3].

Widmark’s “reduced body mass,” or “r” value represents that proportion of the body available for the distribution of alcohol, and is an important part of the calculation. The average “r” values reported by Widmark (male average 0.68, standard deviation 0.085; female average 0.55, standard deviation 0.055) are often used as defaults, but they are open to question on several grounds:

They are based on very small series (20 men and 10 women), so significant statistical variation due to non-random selection is quite possible;
Widmark did not claim that the range of values in his subjects was representative of humans in general; and
Several more modern studies report higher average figures, although the observed ranges generally overlap Widmark’s experimental results [4, 5].
It is an inconvenient fact that the specific Widmark “r” value for an individual can be known with certainty only by experiment, and furthermore that it can change with the passage of time. It is possible, however, to make a reasonable estimate of the “r” value at the time of interest; several methods have been proposed for this. Notable among such methods is that of Forrest [6], which is based upon the Body Mass Index (BMI; weight divided by height squared).

Daniel asks…

How can a weak, skinny girl get in shape?

I’m 14, 5 foot and about 83 lb. I want to get in shape, but I can’t afford to lose weight, I’m already way too thin. However, all the lose no weight yet get buff regimes are things like chin-ups, when to this day I can’t crank out one push-up. How can I get in shape?

The Expert answers:

You do need daily exercise which is necessary to prevent heart disease and, especially for females, to prevent them getting osteoporosis – brittle bone disease – in later life, and to keep you fit and healthy. I suggest you attend an aerobics class to build up your fitness. It concentrates on suppleness, not strength.
You also need to eat fruit or drink fruit juice in between meals to keep your Glycemic Index at a constant level (keep topping up the tank) – hence the 5 a day mantra. This is your blood sugar (glucose) level and provides your energy.
To diet and control weight properly needs some science behind it.
When you eat is just as important as what you eat. Chocolate is best eaten in the morning when you can burn off the calories it gives. If eaten at night when there is likely to be no exercise before going to bed, it will end up as white fat and increase your weight but do it unhealthily. Alcohol consumption is the same and it is best to avoid alcohol if on a diet. Carbohydrates like potatoes and bread are fuels, but will convert to white fat if not used – and this is likely if eaten late of an evening.
Although energetic sports will help you to lose weight, moderate exercise alone will not. The weight loss is usually water which is soon replaced, and it doesn’t burn as many calories as people think. A moderately-loaded exercise cycle ridden at 30 mph only burns around 3 calories per minute and uses 5.6 calories/mile. These figures are not erroneous. As a check: the average 25 year old 5’4” tall woman who weighs 120 lbs. And has a moderately active lifestyle will need 1900 calories all day.(1 day=1440 minutes) That is an average of 1.33 calories/min. The average 25 year old 5’8” tall man who weighs 140 lbs. And has a moderately active lifestyle will need 2280 calories all day. That is an average of 1.6 calories/min.
As someone who has been on a diet and keep fit regime for seven years, my advice is to treat diet as the way to control your weight and leave exercise for keeping fit – you can then forget about calories and just enjoy the exercise. You need to separate the two in your mind.
There are two things you need to know about weight control. The first is how many calories you will need per day.
You are using energy even when you are asleep. BMR is your Basal Metabolic Rate, which is the number of calories you’d burn if you stayed in bed all day. Strangely, if you try a starvation diet to lose weight it will decrease your BMR, making it harder to lose weight and so is counter-productive. BMR decreases with age, making it harder to lose weight as you age but cardiovascular exercises can increase it. I have calculated it for you and it is 1232.25. Now you multiply it by a factor which depends upon how much physical activity you will do in the day. It ranges from 1.2 (sedentary) to 1.9 (very active). This will give you the number of calories you will need.
The second is an assessment of your weight.
For that you need know your Body Mass Index, which is the clinical figure that determines if you are under-, normal-, or overweight. In your case it is 16.2 and the normal range is 18.5 – 24.9, which equates to 95 lbs. – 128 lbs. At your height, so you are quite underweight and need to gain 14 lbs. To put you in the normal range.
If you live in the UK I suggest you contact your local NHS office and speak to a Health Trainer. Knowing your BMR and your BMI will let them give you diet and fitness advice which will help you achieve your objective. They’re the experts and their service is free.
If you live in the US ask the equivalent people at your local Medical Center.

Lisa asks…

Wat is the average weight for a 5’6 athletic 14 yr old girl?

Im 14 and i weigh 120 and im pretty sure its mostly muscle but idk and where is the best place to get pants if ur this body type cause i go to hollister and stuff and i have to wear a size 6 and the butt doesnt rly fit. Thanks!
I have the same problem with ae they fit me around the waste but not around my butt its all loose its so annoyin!

The Expert answers:

That’s average for athletic girl your height and age
http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/
(body mass index (BMI) is a measure of body fat based on
height and weight that applies to both adult men and women)
you can go to that site and calculate your bmi,
and see if your normal

hm, I’m 5’4 and I’m a cheerleader, i was in rugby
I’m very athletic, I’m 15 turning 16
anyways, i shop at American eagle
there jeans are so comfortable
blue-notes has cheep nice jeans,
hollister, i never bought jeans there before, so i don’t
know what there like
old navy has nice jeans but there sizes are screwed up i find
also, west 49 has nice jeans, but there really long
where I’m short i have a lot of extra jean room at the bottom
where your taller you may not have that problem

Mary asks…

From a non-biast point of veiw, is Creatine dangerous? Has it been scientifically prooved that it works?

I have been taking Amplified Creatine 189 for a couple months. I belive that is is working wonderfully. Can results be different for certain people? Has this product been clinically proven to work?

The Expert answers:

Creatine is often taken by athletes as a supplement for those wishing to gain muscle mass (bodybuilding). There are a number of forms but the most common are creatine monohydrate – creatine complexed with a molecule of water, and Creatine ethyl ester (CEE). A number of methods for ingestion exist – as a powder mixed into a drink, or as a capsule or caplet. Once ingested, creatine is highly bioavailable, whether it is ingested as the crystalline monohydrate form, the free form in solution, or even in meat. Creatine salts will become the free form when dissolved in aqueous solution. Conventional wisdom recommends the consumption of creatine with high glycemic index carbohydrates, though research indicates that the use of high GI carbs in combination with protein is also beneficial.[5]

There is scientific evidence that taking creatine supplements can marginally increase athletic performance in high-intensity anaerobic repetitive cycling sprints, but studies in swimmers and runners have been less than promising, most likely because these activities are sustained at a given intensity and thus do not allow for significant intra-exercise synthesis of additional creatine phosphate molecules. Ingesting creatine can increase the level of phosphocreatine in the muscles up to 20%. It must be noted creatine has no significant effect on aerobic endurance, though it will increase power during aerobic exercise.[6]

Since body mass gains of about 1 kg can occur in a week’s time, many studies suggest that the gain is simply due to greater water retention inside the muscle cells. However, studies into the long-term effect of creatine supplementation suggest that body mass gains cannot be explained by increases in intracellular water alone.[7] In the longer term, the increase in total body water is reported to be proportional to the weight gains, which means that the percentage of total body water is not significantly changed. The magnitude of the weight gains during training over a period of several weeks argue against the water-retention theory.

Also, research has shown that creatine increases the activity of satellite cells, which make muscle hypertrophy possible. Creatine supplementation appears to increase the number of myonuclei that satellite cells will ‘donate’ to damaged muscle fibers, which increases the potential for growth of those fibers. This increase in myonuclei probably stems from creatine’s ability to increase levels of the myogenic transcription factor MRF4.[8][9].

In another study, researchers concluded that changes in substrate oxidation may influence the inhibition of fat mass loss associated with creatine after weight training when they discovered that fat mass did not change significantly with creatine but decreased after the placebo trial in a 12-week study on ten active men. The study also showed that 1-RM bench press and total body mass increased after creatine, but not after placebo.[10] The underlying effect of Creatine on body composition if there is indeed one has yet to be determined, as another study with a similar timeframe suggests no effect on body composition, but had less overall emphasis on metabolic effects. [11]

Creatine use is not considered doping and is not banned by the majority of sport-governing bodies. However, in the United States, the NCAA recently ruled that colleges could not provide creatine supplements to their players, though the players are still allowed to obtain and use creatine independently.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Your Questions About Fitness

Sharon asks…

How much am I supposed to weigh?

What is the correct weight for a 19 year old female that is around 5’5? And is there any way that I can gain weight? I’ve been 111 for the past three years, and no matter how much I eat, I can’t gain weight. I either stay the same, or lose it. Im four pounds underweight to donate blood but I really want too and I was just wondering what you’re supposed to weigh at my age.

The Expert answers:

First of all is it AWESOME that you want to donate blood. Hooray for you. You are within a healthy weight range for your height and age. You can go to this website which shows healthy body mass index for you. Http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi

I wouldn’t worry about trying to gain weight unless you really feel you are too thin, then the best way to do it is to start lifting weights. You won’t beef up or start to look like a man I promise. But you will build muscle which weighs more than any other tissue and can gain a few “healthy” pounds this way.

Thomas asks…

What is the mathematical formula for retrograde extrapolation?

The Expert answers:

The mathematical method propounded by Professor Dr EMP Widmark [1, 2] for estimation of blood alcohol levels from consumption and vice versa has proven robust and continues in general use after the passage of more than seventy years, despite the development of other, arguably more exact, approaches such as that of Watson [3].

Widmark’s “reduced body mass,” or “r” value represents that proportion of the body available for the distribution of alcohol, and is an important part of the calculation. The average “r” values reported by Widmark (male average 0.68, standard deviation 0.085; female average 0.55, standard deviation 0.055) are often used as defaults, but they are open to question on several grounds:

They are based on very small series (20 men and 10 women), so significant statistical variation due to non-random selection is quite possible;
Widmark did not claim that the range of values in his subjects was representative of humans in general; and
Several more modern studies report higher average figures, although the observed ranges generally overlap Widmark’s experimental results [4, 5].
It is an inconvenient fact that the specific Widmark “r” value for an individual can be known with certainty only by experiment, and furthermore that it can change with the passage of time. It is possible, however, to make a reasonable estimate of the “r” value at the time of interest; several methods have been proposed for this. Notable among such methods is that of Forrest [6], which is based upon the Body Mass Index (BMI; weight divided by height squared).

Lizzie asks…

How can a weak, skinny girl get in shape?

I’m 14, 5 foot and about 83 lb. I want to get in shape, but I can’t afford to lose weight, I’m already way too thin. However, all the lose no weight yet get buff regimes are things like chin-ups, when to this day I can’t crank out one push-up. How can I get in shape?

The Expert answers:

You do need daily exercise which is necessary to prevent heart disease and, especially for females, to prevent them getting osteoporosis – brittle bone disease – in later life, and to keep you fit and healthy. I suggest you attend an aerobics class to build up your fitness. It concentrates on suppleness, not strength.
You also need to eat fruit or drink fruit juice in between meals to keep your Glycemic Index at a constant level (keep topping up the tank) – hence the 5 a day mantra. This is your blood sugar (glucose) level and provides your energy.
To diet and control weight properly needs some science behind it.
When you eat is just as important as what you eat. Chocolate is best eaten in the morning when you can burn off the calories it gives. If eaten at night when there is likely to be no exercise before going to bed, it will end up as white fat and increase your weight but do it unhealthily. Alcohol consumption is the same and it is best to avoid alcohol if on a diet. Carbohydrates like potatoes and bread are fuels, but will convert to white fat if not used – and this is likely if eaten late of an evening.
Although energetic sports will help you to lose weight, moderate exercise alone will not. The weight loss is usually water which is soon replaced, and it doesn’t burn as many calories as people think. A moderately-loaded exercise cycle ridden at 30 mph only burns around 3 calories per minute and uses 5.6 calories/mile. These figures are not erroneous. As a check: the average 25 year old 5’4” tall woman who weighs 120 lbs. And has a moderately active lifestyle will need 1900 calories all day.(1 day=1440 minutes) That is an average of 1.33 calories/min. The average 25 year old 5’8” tall man who weighs 140 lbs. And has a moderately active lifestyle will need 2280 calories all day. That is an average of 1.6 calories/min.
As someone who has been on a diet and keep fit regime for seven years, my advice is to treat diet as the way to control your weight and leave exercise for keeping fit – you can then forget about calories and just enjoy the exercise. You need to separate the two in your mind.
There are two things you need to know about weight control. The first is how many calories you will need per day.
You are using energy even when you are asleep. BMR is your Basal Metabolic Rate, which is the number of calories you’d burn if you stayed in bed all day. Strangely, if you try a starvation diet to lose weight it will decrease your BMR, making it harder to lose weight and so is counter-productive. BMR decreases with age, making it harder to lose weight as you age but cardiovascular exercises can increase it. I have calculated it for you and it is 1232.25. Now you multiply it by a factor which depends upon how much physical activity you will do in the day. It ranges from 1.2 (sedentary) to 1.9 (very active). This will give you the number of calories you will need.
The second is an assessment of your weight.
For that you need know your Body Mass Index, which is the clinical figure that determines if you are under-, normal-, or overweight. In your case it is 16.2 and the normal range is 18.5 – 24.9, which equates to 95 lbs. – 128 lbs. At your height, so you are quite underweight and need to gain 14 lbs. To put you in the normal range.
If you live in the UK I suggest you contact your local NHS office and speak to a Health Trainer. Knowing your BMR and your BMI will let them give you diet and fitness advice which will help you achieve your objective. They’re the experts and their service is free.
If you live in the US ask the equivalent people at your local Medical Center.

Richard asks…

Wat is the average weight for a 5’6 athletic 14 yr old girl?

Im 14 and i weigh 120 and im pretty sure its mostly muscle but idk and where is the best place to get pants if ur this body type cause i go to hollister and stuff and i have to wear a size 6 and the butt doesnt rly fit. Thanks!
I have the same problem with ae they fit me around the waste but not around my butt its all loose its so annoyin!

The Expert answers:

That’s average for athletic girl your height and age
http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/
(body mass index (BMI) is a measure of body fat based on
height and weight that applies to both adult men and women)
you can go to that site and calculate your bmi,
and see if your normal

hm, I’m 5’4 and I’m a cheerleader, i was in rugby
I’m very athletic, I’m 15 turning 16
anyways, i shop at American eagle
there jeans are so comfortable
blue-notes has cheep nice jeans,
hollister, i never bought jeans there before, so i don’t
know what there like
old navy has nice jeans but there sizes are screwed up i find
also, west 49 has nice jeans, but there really long
where I’m short i have a lot of extra jean room at the bottom
where your taller you may not have that problem

Carol asks…

From a non-biast point of veiw, is Creatine dangerous? Has it been scientifically prooved that it works?

I have been taking Amplified Creatine 189 for a couple months. I belive that is is working wonderfully. Can results be different for certain people? Has this product been clinically proven to work?

The Expert answers:

Creatine is often taken by athletes as a supplement for those wishing to gain muscle mass (bodybuilding). There are a number of forms but the most common are creatine monohydrate – creatine complexed with a molecule of water, and Creatine ethyl ester (CEE). A number of methods for ingestion exist – as a powder mixed into a drink, or as a capsule or caplet. Once ingested, creatine is highly bioavailable, whether it is ingested as the crystalline monohydrate form, the free form in solution, or even in meat. Creatine salts will become the free form when dissolved in aqueous solution. Conventional wisdom recommends the consumption of creatine with high glycemic index carbohydrates, though research indicates that the use of high GI carbs in combination with protein is also beneficial.[5]

There is scientific evidence that taking creatine supplements can marginally increase athletic performance in high-intensity anaerobic repetitive cycling sprints, but studies in swimmers and runners have been less than promising, most likely because these activities are sustained at a given intensity and thus do not allow for significant intra-exercise synthesis of additional creatine phosphate molecules. Ingesting creatine can increase the level of phosphocreatine in the muscles up to 20%. It must be noted creatine has no significant effect on aerobic endurance, though it will increase power during aerobic exercise.[6]

Since body mass gains of about 1 kg can occur in a week’s time, many studies suggest that the gain is simply due to greater water retention inside the muscle cells. However, studies into the long-term effect of creatine supplementation suggest that body mass gains cannot be explained by increases in intracellular water alone.[7] In the longer term, the increase in total body water is reported to be proportional to the weight gains, which means that the percentage of total body water is not significantly changed. The magnitude of the weight gains during training over a period of several weeks argue against the water-retention theory.

Also, research has shown that creatine increases the activity of satellite cells, which make muscle hypertrophy possible. Creatine supplementation appears to increase the number of myonuclei that satellite cells will ‘donate’ to damaged muscle fibers, which increases the potential for growth of those fibers. This increase in myonuclei probably stems from creatine’s ability to increase levels of the myogenic transcription factor MRF4.[8][9].

In another study, researchers concluded that changes in substrate oxidation may influence the inhibition of fat mass loss associated with creatine after weight training when they discovered that fat mass did not change significantly with creatine but decreased after the placebo trial in a 12-week study on ten active men. The study also showed that 1-RM bench press and total body mass increased after creatine, but not after placebo.[10] The underlying effect of Creatine on body composition if there is indeed one has yet to be determined, as another study with a similar timeframe suggests no effect on body composition, but had less overall emphasis on metabolic effects. [11]

Creatine use is not considered doping and is not banned by the majority of sport-governing bodies. However, in the United States, the NCAA recently ruled that colleges could not provide creatine supplements to their players, though the players are still allowed to obtain and use creatine independently.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Your Questions About Fitness

James asks…

How much am I supposed to weigh?

What is the correct weight for a 19 year old female that is around 5’5? And is there any way that I can gain weight? I’ve been 111 for the past three years, and no matter how much I eat, I can’t gain weight. I either stay the same, or lose it. Im four pounds underweight to donate blood but I really want too and I was just wondering what you’re supposed to weigh at my age.

The Expert answers:

First of all is it AWESOME that you want to donate blood. Hooray for you. You are within a healthy weight range for your height and age. You can go to this website which shows healthy body mass index for you. Http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi

I wouldn’t worry about trying to gain weight unless you really feel you are too thin, then the best way to do it is to start lifting weights. You won’t beef up or start to look like a man I promise. But you will build muscle which weighs more than any other tissue and can gain a few “healthy” pounds this way.

Laura asks…

What is the mathematical formula for retrograde extrapolation?

The Expert answers:

The mathematical method propounded by Professor Dr EMP Widmark [1, 2] for estimation of blood alcohol levels from consumption and vice versa has proven robust and continues in general use after the passage of more than seventy years, despite the development of other, arguably more exact, approaches such as that of Watson [3].

Widmark’s “reduced body mass,” or “r” value represents that proportion of the body available for the distribution of alcohol, and is an important part of the calculation. The average “r” values reported by Widmark (male average 0.68, standard deviation 0.085; female average 0.55, standard deviation 0.055) are often used as defaults, but they are open to question on several grounds:

They are based on very small series (20 men and 10 women), so significant statistical variation due to non-random selection is quite possible;
Widmark did not claim that the range of values in his subjects was representative of humans in general; and
Several more modern studies report higher average figures, although the observed ranges generally overlap Widmark’s experimental results [4, 5].
It is an inconvenient fact that the specific Widmark “r” value for an individual can be known with certainty only by experiment, and furthermore that it can change with the passage of time. It is possible, however, to make a reasonable estimate of the “r” value at the time of interest; several methods have been proposed for this. Notable among such methods is that of Forrest [6], which is based upon the Body Mass Index (BMI; weight divided by height squared).

William asks…

How can a weak, skinny girl get in shape?

I’m 14, 5 foot and about 83 lb. I want to get in shape, but I can’t afford to lose weight, I’m already way too thin. However, all the lose no weight yet get buff regimes are things like chin-ups, when to this day I can’t crank out one push-up. How can I get in shape?

The Expert answers:

You do need daily exercise which is necessary to prevent heart disease and, especially for females, to prevent them getting osteoporosis – brittle bone disease – in later life, and to keep you fit and healthy. I suggest you attend an aerobics class to build up your fitness. It concentrates on suppleness, not strength.
You also need to eat fruit or drink fruit juice in between meals to keep your Glycemic Index at a constant level (keep topping up the tank) – hence the 5 a day mantra. This is your blood sugar (glucose) level and provides your energy.
To diet and control weight properly needs some science behind it.
When you eat is just as important as what you eat. Chocolate is best eaten in the morning when you can burn off the calories it gives. If eaten at night when there is likely to be no exercise before going to bed, it will end up as white fat and increase your weight but do it unhealthily. Alcohol consumption is the same and it is best to avoid alcohol if on a diet. Carbohydrates like potatoes and bread are fuels, but will convert to white fat if not used – and this is likely if eaten late of an evening.
Although energetic sports will help you to lose weight, moderate exercise alone will not. The weight loss is usually water which is soon replaced, and it doesn’t burn as many calories as people think. A moderately-loaded exercise cycle ridden at 30 mph only burns around 3 calories per minute and uses 5.6 calories/mile. These figures are not erroneous. As a check: the average 25 year old 5’4” tall woman who weighs 120 lbs. And has a moderately active lifestyle will need 1900 calories all day.(1 day=1440 minutes) That is an average of 1.33 calories/min. The average 25 year old 5’8” tall man who weighs 140 lbs. And has a moderately active lifestyle will need 2280 calories all day. That is an average of 1.6 calories/min.
As someone who has been on a diet and keep fit regime for seven years, my advice is to treat diet as the way to control your weight and leave exercise for keeping fit – you can then forget about calories and just enjoy the exercise. You need to separate the two in your mind.
There are two things you need to know about weight control. The first is how many calories you will need per day.
You are using energy even when you are asleep. BMR is your Basal Metabolic Rate, which is the number of calories you’d burn if you stayed in bed all day. Strangely, if you try a starvation diet to lose weight it will decrease your BMR, making it harder to lose weight and so is counter-productive. BMR decreases with age, making it harder to lose weight as you age but cardiovascular exercises can increase it. I have calculated it for you and it is 1232.25. Now you multiply it by a factor which depends upon how much physical activity you will do in the day. It ranges from 1.2 (sedentary) to 1.9 (very active). This will give you the number of calories you will need.
The second is an assessment of your weight.
For that you need know your Body Mass Index, which is the clinical figure that determines if you are under-, normal-, or overweight. In your case it is 16.2 and the normal range is 18.5 – 24.9, which equates to 95 lbs. – 128 lbs. At your height, so you are quite underweight and need to gain 14 lbs. To put you in the normal range.
If you live in the UK I suggest you contact your local NHS office and speak to a Health Trainer. Knowing your BMR and your BMI will let them give you diet and fitness advice which will help you achieve your objective. They’re the experts and their service is free.
If you live in the US ask the equivalent people at your local Medical Center.

Thomas asks…

Wat is the average weight for a 5’6 athletic 14 yr old girl?

Im 14 and i weigh 120 and im pretty sure its mostly muscle but idk and where is the best place to get pants if ur this body type cause i go to hollister and stuff and i have to wear a size 6 and the butt doesnt rly fit. Thanks!
I have the same problem with ae they fit me around the waste but not around my butt its all loose its so annoyin!

The Expert answers:

That’s average for athletic girl your height and age
http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/
(body mass index (BMI) is a measure of body fat based on
height and weight that applies to both adult men and women)
you can go to that site and calculate your bmi,
and see if your normal

hm, I’m 5’4 and I’m a cheerleader, i was in rugby
I’m very athletic, I’m 15 turning 16
anyways, i shop at American eagle
there jeans are so comfortable
blue-notes has cheep nice jeans,
hollister, i never bought jeans there before, so i don’t
know what there like
old navy has nice jeans but there sizes are screwed up i find
also, west 49 has nice jeans, but there really long
where I’m short i have a lot of extra jean room at the bottom
where your taller you may not have that problem

Charles asks…

From a non-biast point of veiw, is Creatine dangerous? Has it been scientifically prooved that it works?

I have been taking Amplified Creatine 189 for a couple months. I belive that is is working wonderfully. Can results be different for certain people? Has this product been clinically proven to work?

The Expert answers:

Creatine is often taken by athletes as a supplement for those wishing to gain muscle mass (bodybuilding). There are a number of forms but the most common are creatine monohydrate – creatine complexed with a molecule of water, and Creatine ethyl ester (CEE). A number of methods for ingestion exist – as a powder mixed into a drink, or as a capsule or caplet. Once ingested, creatine is highly bioavailable, whether it is ingested as the crystalline monohydrate form, the free form in solution, or even in meat. Creatine salts will become the free form when dissolved in aqueous solution. Conventional wisdom recommends the consumption of creatine with high glycemic index carbohydrates, though research indicates that the use of high GI carbs in combination with protein is also beneficial.[5]

There is scientific evidence that taking creatine supplements can marginally increase athletic performance in high-intensity anaerobic repetitive cycling sprints, but studies in swimmers and runners have been less than promising, most likely because these activities are sustained at a given intensity and thus do not allow for significant intra-exercise synthesis of additional creatine phosphate molecules. Ingesting creatine can increase the level of phosphocreatine in the muscles up to 20%. It must be noted creatine has no significant effect on aerobic endurance, though it will increase power during aerobic exercise.[6]

Since body mass gains of about 1 kg can occur in a week’s time, many studies suggest that the gain is simply due to greater water retention inside the muscle cells. However, studies into the long-term effect of creatine supplementation suggest that body mass gains cannot be explained by increases in intracellular water alone.[7] In the longer term, the increase in total body water is reported to be proportional to the weight gains, which means that the percentage of total body water is not significantly changed. The magnitude of the weight gains during training over a period of several weeks argue against the water-retention theory.

Also, research has shown that creatine increases the activity of satellite cells, which make muscle hypertrophy possible. Creatine supplementation appears to increase the number of myonuclei that satellite cells will ‘donate’ to damaged muscle fibers, which increases the potential for growth of those fibers. This increase in myonuclei probably stems from creatine’s ability to increase levels of the myogenic transcription factor MRF4.[8][9].

In another study, researchers concluded that changes in substrate oxidation may influence the inhibition of fat mass loss associated with creatine after weight training when they discovered that fat mass did not change significantly with creatine but decreased after the placebo trial in a 12-week study on ten active men. The study also showed that 1-RM bench press and total body mass increased after creatine, but not after placebo.[10] The underlying effect of Creatine on body composition if there is indeed one has yet to be determined, as another study with a similar timeframe suggests no effect on body composition, but had less overall emphasis on metabolic effects. [11]

Creatine use is not considered doping and is not banned by the majority of sport-governing bodies. However, in the United States, the NCAA recently ruled that colleges could not provide creatine supplements to their players, though the players are still allowed to obtain and use creatine independently.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Your Questions About Fitness

Laura asks…

How much am I supposed to weigh?

What is the correct weight for a 19 year old female that is around 5’5? And is there any way that I can gain weight? I’ve been 111 for the past three years, and no matter how much I eat, I can’t gain weight. I either stay the same, or lose it. Im four pounds underweight to donate blood but I really want too and I was just wondering what you’re supposed to weigh at my age.

The Expert answers:

First of all is it AWESOME that you want to donate blood. Hooray for you. You are within a healthy weight range for your height and age. You can go to this website which shows healthy body mass index for you. Http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi

I wouldn’t worry about trying to gain weight unless you really feel you are too thin, then the best way to do it is to start lifting weights. You won’t beef up or start to look like a man I promise. But you will build muscle which weighs more than any other tissue and can gain a few “healthy” pounds this way.

Mary asks…

What is the mathematical formula for retrograde extrapolation?

The Expert answers:

The mathematical method propounded by Professor Dr EMP Widmark [1, 2] for estimation of blood alcohol levels from consumption and vice versa has proven robust and continues in general use after the passage of more than seventy years, despite the development of other, arguably more exact, approaches such as that of Watson [3].

Widmark’s “reduced body mass,” or “r” value represents that proportion of the body available for the distribution of alcohol, and is an important part of the calculation. The average “r” values reported by Widmark (male average 0.68, standard deviation 0.085; female average 0.55, standard deviation 0.055) are often used as defaults, but they are open to question on several grounds:

They are based on very small series (20 men and 10 women), so significant statistical variation due to non-random selection is quite possible;
Widmark did not claim that the range of values in his subjects was representative of humans in general; and
Several more modern studies report higher average figures, although the observed ranges generally overlap Widmark’s experimental results [4, 5].
It is an inconvenient fact that the specific Widmark “r” value for an individual can be known with certainty only by experiment, and furthermore that it can change with the passage of time. It is possible, however, to make a reasonable estimate of the “r” value at the time of interest; several methods have been proposed for this. Notable among such methods is that of Forrest [6], which is based upon the Body Mass Index (BMI; weight divided by height squared).

Ruth asks…

How can a weak, skinny girl get in shape?

I’m 14, 5 foot and about 83 lb. I want to get in shape, but I can’t afford to lose weight, I’m already way too thin. However, all the lose no weight yet get buff regimes are things like chin-ups, when to this day I can’t crank out one push-up. How can I get in shape?

The Expert answers:

You do need daily exercise which is necessary to prevent heart disease and, especially for females, to prevent them getting osteoporosis – brittle bone disease – in later life, and to keep you fit and healthy. I suggest you attend an aerobics class to build up your fitness. It concentrates on suppleness, not strength.
You also need to eat fruit or drink fruit juice in between meals to keep your Glycemic Index at a constant level (keep topping up the tank) – hence the 5 a day mantra. This is your blood sugar (glucose) level and provides your energy.
To diet and control weight properly needs some science behind it.
When you eat is just as important as what you eat. Chocolate is best eaten in the morning when you can burn off the calories it gives. If eaten at night when there is likely to be no exercise before going to bed, it will end up as white fat and increase your weight but do it unhealthily. Alcohol consumption is the same and it is best to avoid alcohol if on a diet. Carbohydrates like potatoes and bread are fuels, but will convert to white fat if not used – and this is likely if eaten late of an evening.
Although energetic sports will help you to lose weight, moderate exercise alone will not. The weight loss is usually water which is soon replaced, and it doesn’t burn as many calories as people think. A moderately-loaded exercise cycle ridden at 30 mph only burns around 3 calories per minute and uses 5.6 calories/mile. These figures are not erroneous. As a check: the average 25 year old 5’4” tall woman who weighs 120 lbs. And has a moderately active lifestyle will need 1900 calories all day.(1 day=1440 minutes) That is an average of 1.33 calories/min. The average 25 year old 5’8” tall man who weighs 140 lbs. And has a moderately active lifestyle will need 2280 calories all day. That is an average of 1.6 calories/min.
As someone who has been on a diet and keep fit regime for seven years, my advice is to treat diet as the way to control your weight and leave exercise for keeping fit – you can then forget about calories and just enjoy the exercise. You need to separate the two in your mind.
There are two things you need to know about weight control. The first is how many calories you will need per day.
You are using energy even when you are asleep. BMR is your Basal Metabolic Rate, which is the number of calories you’d burn if you stayed in bed all day. Strangely, if you try a starvation diet to lose weight it will decrease your BMR, making it harder to lose weight and so is counter-productive. BMR decreases with age, making it harder to lose weight as you age but cardiovascular exercises can increase it. I have calculated it for you and it is 1232.25. Now you multiply it by a factor which depends upon how much physical activity you will do in the day. It ranges from 1.2 (sedentary) to 1.9 (very active). This will give you the number of calories you will need.
The second is an assessment of your weight.
For that you need know your Body Mass Index, which is the clinical figure that determines if you are under-, normal-, or overweight. In your case it is 16.2 and the normal range is 18.5 – 24.9, which equates to 95 lbs. – 128 lbs. At your height, so you are quite underweight and need to gain 14 lbs. To put you in the normal range.
If you live in the UK I suggest you contact your local NHS office and speak to a Health Trainer. Knowing your BMR and your BMI will let them give you diet and fitness advice which will help you achieve your objective. They’re the experts and their service is free.
If you live in the US ask the equivalent people at your local Medical Center.

Helen asks…

Wat is the average weight for a 5’6 athletic 14 yr old girl?

Im 14 and i weigh 120 and im pretty sure its mostly muscle but idk and where is the best place to get pants if ur this body type cause i go to hollister and stuff and i have to wear a size 6 and the butt doesnt rly fit. Thanks!
I have the same problem with ae they fit me around the waste but not around my butt its all loose its so annoyin!

The Expert answers:

That’s average for athletic girl your height and age
http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/
(body mass index (BMI) is a measure of body fat based on
height and weight that applies to both adult men and women)
you can go to that site and calculate your bmi,
and see if your normal

hm, I’m 5’4 and I’m a cheerleader, i was in rugby
I’m very athletic, I’m 15 turning 16
anyways, i shop at American eagle
there jeans are so comfortable
blue-notes has cheep nice jeans,
hollister, i never bought jeans there before, so i don’t
know what there like
old navy has nice jeans but there sizes are screwed up i find
also, west 49 has nice jeans, but there really long
where I’m short i have a lot of extra jean room at the bottom
where your taller you may not have that problem

Paul asks…

From a non-biast point of veiw, is Creatine dangerous? Has it been scientifically prooved that it works?

I have been taking Amplified Creatine 189 for a couple months. I belive that is is working wonderfully. Can results be different for certain people? Has this product been clinically proven to work?

The Expert answers:

Creatine is often taken by athletes as a supplement for those wishing to gain muscle mass (bodybuilding). There are a number of forms but the most common are creatine monohydrate – creatine complexed with a molecule of water, and Creatine ethyl ester (CEE). A number of methods for ingestion exist – as a powder mixed into a drink, or as a capsule or caplet. Once ingested, creatine is highly bioavailable, whether it is ingested as the crystalline monohydrate form, the free form in solution, or even in meat. Creatine salts will become the free form when dissolved in aqueous solution. Conventional wisdom recommends the consumption of creatine with high glycemic index carbohydrates, though research indicates that the use of high GI carbs in combination with protein is also beneficial.[5]

There is scientific evidence that taking creatine supplements can marginally increase athletic performance in high-intensity anaerobic repetitive cycling sprints, but studies in swimmers and runners have been less than promising, most likely because these activities are sustained at a given intensity and thus do not allow for significant intra-exercise synthesis of additional creatine phosphate molecules. Ingesting creatine can increase the level of phosphocreatine in the muscles up to 20%. It must be noted creatine has no significant effect on aerobic endurance, though it will increase power during aerobic exercise.[6]

Since body mass gains of about 1 kg can occur in a week’s time, many studies suggest that the gain is simply due to greater water retention inside the muscle cells. However, studies into the long-term effect of creatine supplementation suggest that body mass gains cannot be explained by increases in intracellular water alone.[7] In the longer term, the increase in total body water is reported to be proportional to the weight gains, which means that the percentage of total body water is not significantly changed. The magnitude of the weight gains during training over a period of several weeks argue against the water-retention theory.

Also, research has shown that creatine increases the activity of satellite cells, which make muscle hypertrophy possible. Creatine supplementation appears to increase the number of myonuclei that satellite cells will ‘donate’ to damaged muscle fibers, which increases the potential for growth of those fibers. This increase in myonuclei probably stems from creatine’s ability to increase levels of the myogenic transcription factor MRF4.[8][9].

In another study, researchers concluded that changes in substrate oxidation may influence the inhibition of fat mass loss associated with creatine after weight training when they discovered that fat mass did not change significantly with creatine but decreased after the placebo trial in a 12-week study on ten active men. The study also showed that 1-RM bench press and total body mass increased after creatine, but not after placebo.[10] The underlying effect of Creatine on body composition if there is indeed one has yet to be determined, as another study with a similar timeframe suggests no effect on body composition, but had less overall emphasis on metabolic effects. [11]

Creatine use is not considered doping and is not banned by the majority of sport-governing bodies. However, in the United States, the NCAA recently ruled that colleges could not provide creatine supplements to their players, though the players are still allowed to obtain and use creatine independently.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Your Questions About Fitness

William asks…

How much am I supposed to weigh?

What is the correct weight for a 19 year old female that is around 5’5? And is there any way that I can gain weight? I’ve been 111 for the past three years, and no matter how much I eat, I can’t gain weight. I either stay the same, or lose it. Im four pounds underweight to donate blood but I really want too and I was just wondering what you’re supposed to weigh at my age.

The Expert answers:

First of all is it AWESOME that you want to donate blood. Hooray for you. You are within a healthy weight range for your height and age. You can go to this website which shows healthy body mass index for you. Http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi

I wouldn’t worry about trying to gain weight unless you really feel you are too thin, then the best way to do it is to start lifting weights. You won’t beef up or start to look like a man I promise. But you will build muscle which weighs more than any other tissue and can gain a few “healthy” pounds this way.

Sandra asks…

What is the mathematical formula for retrograde extrapolation?

The Expert answers:

The mathematical method propounded by Professor Dr EMP Widmark [1, 2] for estimation of blood alcohol levels from consumption and vice versa has proven robust and continues in general use after the passage of more than seventy years, despite the development of other, arguably more exact, approaches such as that of Watson [3].

Widmark’s “reduced body mass,” or “r” value represents that proportion of the body available for the distribution of alcohol, and is an important part of the calculation. The average “r” values reported by Widmark (male average 0.68, standard deviation 0.085; female average 0.55, standard deviation 0.055) are often used as defaults, but they are open to question on several grounds:

They are based on very small series (20 men and 10 women), so significant statistical variation due to non-random selection is quite possible;
Widmark did not claim that the range of values in his subjects was representative of humans in general; and
Several more modern studies report higher average figures, although the observed ranges generally overlap Widmark’s experimental results [4, 5].
It is an inconvenient fact that the specific Widmark “r” value for an individual can be known with certainty only by experiment, and furthermore that it can change with the passage of time. It is possible, however, to make a reasonable estimate of the “r” value at the time of interest; several methods have been proposed for this. Notable among such methods is that of Forrest [6], which is based upon the Body Mass Index (BMI; weight divided by height squared).

George asks…

How can a weak, skinny girl get in shape?

I’m 14, 5 foot and about 83 lb. I want to get in shape, but I can’t afford to lose weight, I’m already way too thin. However, all the lose no weight yet get buff regimes are things like chin-ups, when to this day I can’t crank out one push-up. How can I get in shape?

The Expert answers:

You do need daily exercise which is necessary to prevent heart disease and, especially for females, to prevent them getting osteoporosis – brittle bone disease – in later life, and to keep you fit and healthy. I suggest you attend an aerobics class to build up your fitness. It concentrates on suppleness, not strength.
You also need to eat fruit or drink fruit juice in between meals to keep your Glycemic Index at a constant level (keep topping up the tank) – hence the 5 a day mantra. This is your blood sugar (glucose) level and provides your energy.
To diet and control weight properly needs some science behind it.
When you eat is just as important as what you eat. Chocolate is best eaten in the morning when you can burn off the calories it gives. If eaten at night when there is likely to be no exercise before going to bed, it will end up as white fat and increase your weight but do it unhealthily. Alcohol consumption is the same and it is best to avoid alcohol if on a diet. Carbohydrates like potatoes and bread are fuels, but will convert to white fat if not used – and this is likely if eaten late of an evening.
Although energetic sports will help you to lose weight, moderate exercise alone will not. The weight loss is usually water which is soon replaced, and it doesn’t burn as many calories as people think. A moderately-loaded exercise cycle ridden at 30 mph only burns around 3 calories per minute and uses 5.6 calories/mile. These figures are not erroneous. As a check: the average 25 year old 5’4” tall woman who weighs 120 lbs. And has a moderately active lifestyle will need 1900 calories all day.(1 day=1440 minutes) That is an average of 1.33 calories/min. The average 25 year old 5’8” tall man who weighs 140 lbs. And has a moderately active lifestyle will need 2280 calories all day. That is an average of 1.6 calories/min.
As someone who has been on a diet and keep fit regime for seven years, my advice is to treat diet as the way to control your weight and leave exercise for keeping fit – you can then forget about calories and just enjoy the exercise. You need to separate the two in your mind.
There are two things you need to know about weight control. The first is how many calories you will need per day.
You are using energy even when you are asleep. BMR is your Basal Metabolic Rate, which is the number of calories you’d burn if you stayed in bed all day. Strangely, if you try a starvation diet to lose weight it will decrease your BMR, making it harder to lose weight and so is counter-productive. BMR decreases with age, making it harder to lose weight as you age but cardiovascular exercises can increase it. I have calculated it for you and it is 1232.25. Now you multiply it by a factor which depends upon how much physical activity you will do in the day. It ranges from 1.2 (sedentary) to 1.9 (very active). This will give you the number of calories you will need.
The second is an assessment of your weight.
For that you need know your Body Mass Index, which is the clinical figure that determines if you are under-, normal-, or overweight. In your case it is 16.2 and the normal range is 18.5 – 24.9, which equates to 95 lbs. – 128 lbs. At your height, so you are quite underweight and need to gain 14 lbs. To put you in the normal range.
If you live in the UK I suggest you contact your local NHS office and speak to a Health Trainer. Knowing your BMR and your BMI will let them give you diet and fitness advice which will help you achieve your objective. They’re the experts and their service is free.
If you live in the US ask the equivalent people at your local Medical Center.

Nancy asks…

Wat is the average weight for a 5’6 athletic 14 yr old girl?

Im 14 and i weigh 120 and im pretty sure its mostly muscle but idk and where is the best place to get pants if ur this body type cause i go to hollister and stuff and i have to wear a size 6 and the butt doesnt rly fit. Thanks!
I have the same problem with ae they fit me around the waste but not around my butt its all loose its so annoyin!

The Expert answers:

That’s average for athletic girl your height and age
http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/
(body mass index (BMI) is a measure of body fat based on
height and weight that applies to both adult men and women)
you can go to that site and calculate your bmi,
and see if your normal

hm, I’m 5’4 and I’m a cheerleader, i was in rugby
I’m very athletic, I’m 15 turning 16
anyways, i shop at American eagle
there jeans are so comfortable
blue-notes has cheep nice jeans,
hollister, i never bought jeans there before, so i don’t
know what there like
old navy has nice jeans but there sizes are screwed up i find
also, west 49 has nice jeans, but there really long
where I’m short i have a lot of extra jean room at the bottom
where your taller you may not have that problem

Mary asks…

From a non-biast point of veiw, is Creatine dangerous? Has it been scientifically prooved that it works?

I have been taking Amplified Creatine 189 for a couple months. I belive that is is working wonderfully. Can results be different for certain people? Has this product been clinically proven to work?

The Expert answers:

Creatine is often taken by athletes as a supplement for those wishing to gain muscle mass (bodybuilding). There are a number of forms but the most common are creatine monohydrate – creatine complexed with a molecule of water, and Creatine ethyl ester (CEE). A number of methods for ingestion exist – as a powder mixed into a drink, or as a capsule or caplet. Once ingested, creatine is highly bioavailable, whether it is ingested as the crystalline monohydrate form, the free form in solution, or even in meat. Creatine salts will become the free form when dissolved in aqueous solution. Conventional wisdom recommends the consumption of creatine with high glycemic index carbohydrates, though research indicates that the use of high GI carbs in combination with protein is also beneficial.[5]

There is scientific evidence that taking creatine supplements can marginally increase athletic performance in high-intensity anaerobic repetitive cycling sprints, but studies in swimmers and runners have been less than promising, most likely because these activities are sustained at a given intensity and thus do not allow for significant intra-exercise synthesis of additional creatine phosphate molecules. Ingesting creatine can increase the level of phosphocreatine in the muscles up to 20%. It must be noted creatine has no significant effect on aerobic endurance, though it will increase power during aerobic exercise.[6]

Since body mass gains of about 1 kg can occur in a week’s time, many studies suggest that the gain is simply due to greater water retention inside the muscle cells. However, studies into the long-term effect of creatine supplementation suggest that body mass gains cannot be explained by increases in intracellular water alone.[7] In the longer term, the increase in total body water is reported to be proportional to the weight gains, which means that the percentage of total body water is not significantly changed. The magnitude of the weight gains during training over a period of several weeks argue against the water-retention theory.

Also, research has shown that creatine increases the activity of satellite cells, which make muscle hypertrophy possible. Creatine supplementation appears to increase the number of myonuclei that satellite cells will ‘donate’ to damaged muscle fibers, which increases the potential for growth of those fibers. This increase in myonuclei probably stems from creatine’s ability to increase levels of the myogenic transcription factor MRF4.[8][9].

In another study, researchers concluded that changes in substrate oxidation may influence the inhibition of fat mass loss associated with creatine after weight training when they discovered that fat mass did not change significantly with creatine but decreased after the placebo trial in a 12-week study on ten active men. The study also showed that 1-RM bench press and total body mass increased after creatine, but not after placebo.[10] The underlying effect of Creatine on body composition if there is indeed one has yet to be determined, as another study with a similar timeframe suggests no effect on body composition, but had less overall emphasis on metabolic effects. [11]

Creatine use is not considered doping and is not banned by the majority of sport-governing bodies. However, in the United States, the NCAA recently ruled that colleges could not provide creatine supplements to their players, though the players are still allowed to obtain and use creatine independently.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Your Questions About Fitness

Maria asks…

How much am I supposed to weigh?

What is the correct weight for a 19 year old female that is around 5’5? And is there any way that I can gain weight? I’ve been 111 for the past three years, and no matter how much I eat, I can’t gain weight. I either stay the same, or lose it. Im four pounds underweight to donate blood but I really want too and I was just wondering what you’re supposed to weigh at my age.

The Expert answers:

First of all is it AWESOME that you want to donate blood. Hooray for you. You are within a healthy weight range for your height and age. You can go to this website which shows healthy body mass index for you. Http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi

I wouldn’t worry about trying to gain weight unless you really feel you are too thin, then the best way to do it is to start lifting weights. You won’t beef up or start to look like a man I promise. But you will build muscle which weighs more than any other tissue and can gain a few “healthy” pounds this way.

Sandra asks…

What is the mathematical formula for retrograde extrapolation?

The Expert answers:

The mathematical method propounded by Professor Dr EMP Widmark [1, 2] for estimation of blood alcohol levels from consumption and vice versa has proven robust and continues in general use after the passage of more than seventy years, despite the development of other, arguably more exact, approaches such as that of Watson [3].

Widmark’s “reduced body mass,” or “r” value represents that proportion of the body available for the distribution of alcohol, and is an important part of the calculation. The average “r” values reported by Widmark (male average 0.68, standard deviation 0.085; female average 0.55, standard deviation 0.055) are often used as defaults, but they are open to question on several grounds:

They are based on very small series (20 men and 10 women), so significant statistical variation due to non-random selection is quite possible;
Widmark did not claim that the range of values in his subjects was representative of humans in general; and
Several more modern studies report higher average figures, although the observed ranges generally overlap Widmark’s experimental results [4, 5].
It is an inconvenient fact that the specific Widmark “r” value for an individual can be known with certainty only by experiment, and furthermore that it can change with the passage of time. It is possible, however, to make a reasonable estimate of the “r” value at the time of interest; several methods have been proposed for this. Notable among such methods is that of Forrest [6], which is based upon the Body Mass Index (BMI; weight divided by height squared).

Charles asks…

How can a weak, skinny girl get in shape?

I’m 14, 5 foot and about 83 lb. I want to get in shape, but I can’t afford to lose weight, I’m already way too thin. However, all the lose no weight yet get buff regimes are things like chin-ups, when to this day I can’t crank out one push-up. How can I get in shape?

The Expert answers:

You do need daily exercise which is necessary to prevent heart disease and, especially for females, to prevent them getting osteoporosis – brittle bone disease – in later life, and to keep you fit and healthy. I suggest you attend an aerobics class to build up your fitness. It concentrates on suppleness, not strength.
You also need to eat fruit or drink fruit juice in between meals to keep your Glycemic Index at a constant level (keep topping up the tank) – hence the 5 a day mantra. This is your blood sugar (glucose) level and provides your energy.
To diet and control weight properly needs some science behind it.
When you eat is just as important as what you eat. Chocolate is best eaten in the morning when you can burn off the calories it gives. If eaten at night when there is likely to be no exercise before going to bed, it will end up as white fat and increase your weight but do it unhealthily. Alcohol consumption is the same and it is best to avoid alcohol if on a diet. Carbohydrates like potatoes and bread are fuels, but will convert to white fat if not used – and this is likely if eaten late of an evening.
Although energetic sports will help you to lose weight, moderate exercise alone will not. The weight loss is usually water which is soon replaced, and it doesn’t burn as many calories as people think. A moderately-loaded exercise cycle ridden at 30 mph only burns around 3 calories per minute and uses 5.6 calories/mile. These figures are not erroneous. As a check: the average 25 year old 5’4” tall woman who weighs 120 lbs. And has a moderately active lifestyle will need 1900 calories all day.(1 day=1440 minutes) That is an average of 1.33 calories/min. The average 25 year old 5’8” tall man who weighs 140 lbs. And has a moderately active lifestyle will need 2280 calories all day. That is an average of 1.6 calories/min.
As someone who has been on a diet and keep fit regime for seven years, my advice is to treat diet as the way to control your weight and leave exercise for keeping fit – you can then forget about calories and just enjoy the exercise. You need to separate the two in your mind.
There are two things you need to know about weight control. The first is how many calories you will need per day.
You are using energy even when you are asleep. BMR is your Basal Metabolic Rate, which is the number of calories you’d burn if you stayed in bed all day. Strangely, if you try a starvation diet to lose weight it will decrease your BMR, making it harder to lose weight and so is counter-productive. BMR decreases with age, making it harder to lose weight as you age but cardiovascular exercises can increase it. I have calculated it for you and it is 1232.25. Now you multiply it by a factor which depends upon how much physical activity you will do in the day. It ranges from 1.2 (sedentary) to 1.9 (very active). This will give you the number of calories you will need.
The second is an assessment of your weight.
For that you need know your Body Mass Index, which is the clinical figure that determines if you are under-, normal-, or overweight. In your case it is 16.2 and the normal range is 18.5 – 24.9, which equates to 95 lbs. – 128 lbs. At your height, so you are quite underweight and need to gain 14 lbs. To put you in the normal range.
If you live in the UK I suggest you contact your local NHS office and speak to a Health Trainer. Knowing your BMR and your BMI will let them give you diet and fitness advice which will help you achieve your objective. They’re the experts and their service is free.
If you live in the US ask the equivalent people at your local Medical Center.

Sharon asks…

Wat is the average weight for a 5’6 athletic 14 yr old girl?

Im 14 and i weigh 120 and im pretty sure its mostly muscle but idk and where is the best place to get pants if ur this body type cause i go to hollister and stuff and i have to wear a size 6 and the butt doesnt rly fit. Thanks!
I have the same problem with ae they fit me around the waste but not around my butt its all loose its so annoyin!

The Expert answers:

That’s average for athletic girl your height and age
http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/
(body mass index (BMI) is a measure of body fat based on
height and weight that applies to both adult men and women)
you can go to that site and calculate your bmi,
and see if your normal

hm, I’m 5’4 and I’m a cheerleader, i was in rugby
I’m very athletic, I’m 15 turning 16
anyways, i shop at American eagle
there jeans are so comfortable
blue-notes has cheep nice jeans,
hollister, i never bought jeans there before, so i don’t
know what there like
old navy has nice jeans but there sizes are screwed up i find
also, west 49 has nice jeans, but there really long
where I’m short i have a lot of extra jean room at the bottom
where your taller you may not have that problem

Helen asks…

From a non-biast point of veiw, is Creatine dangerous? Has it been scientifically prooved that it works?

I have been taking Amplified Creatine 189 for a couple months. I belive that is is working wonderfully. Can results be different for certain people? Has this product been clinically proven to work?

The Expert answers:

Creatine is often taken by athletes as a supplement for those wishing to gain muscle mass (bodybuilding). There are a number of forms but the most common are creatine monohydrate – creatine complexed with a molecule of water, and Creatine ethyl ester (CEE). A number of methods for ingestion exist – as a powder mixed into a drink, or as a capsule or caplet. Once ingested, creatine is highly bioavailable, whether it is ingested as the crystalline monohydrate form, the free form in solution, or even in meat. Creatine salts will become the free form when dissolved in aqueous solution. Conventional wisdom recommends the consumption of creatine with high glycemic index carbohydrates, though research indicates that the use of high GI carbs in combination with protein is also beneficial.[5]

There is scientific evidence that taking creatine supplements can marginally increase athletic performance in high-intensity anaerobic repetitive cycling sprints, but studies in swimmers and runners have been less than promising, most likely because these activities are sustained at a given intensity and thus do not allow for significant intra-exercise synthesis of additional creatine phosphate molecules. Ingesting creatine can increase the level of phosphocreatine in the muscles up to 20%. It must be noted creatine has no significant effect on aerobic endurance, though it will increase power during aerobic exercise.[6]

Since body mass gains of about 1 kg can occur in a week’s time, many studies suggest that the gain is simply due to greater water retention inside the muscle cells. However, studies into the long-term effect of creatine supplementation suggest that body mass gains cannot be explained by increases in intracellular water alone.[7] In the longer term, the increase in total body water is reported to be proportional to the weight gains, which means that the percentage of total body water is not significantly changed. The magnitude of the weight gains during training over a period of several weeks argue against the water-retention theory.

Also, research has shown that creatine increases the activity of satellite cells, which make muscle hypertrophy possible. Creatine supplementation appears to increase the number of myonuclei that satellite cells will ‘donate’ to damaged muscle fibers, which increases the potential for growth of those fibers. This increase in myonuclei probably stems from creatine’s ability to increase levels of the myogenic transcription factor MRF4.[8][9].

In another study, researchers concluded that changes in substrate oxidation may influence the inhibition of fat mass loss associated with creatine after weight training when they discovered that fat mass did not change significantly with creatine but decreased after the placebo trial in a 12-week study on ten active men. The study also showed that 1-RM bench press and total body mass increased after creatine, but not after placebo.[10] The underlying effect of Creatine on body composition if there is indeed one has yet to be determined, as another study with a similar timeframe suggests no effect on body composition, but had less overall emphasis on metabolic effects. [11]

Creatine use is not considered doping and is not banned by the majority of sport-governing bodies. However, in the United States, the NCAA recently ruled that colleges could not provide creatine supplements to their players, though the players are still allowed to obtain and use creatine independently.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Your Questions About Fitness

Mark asks…

How much am I supposed to weigh?

What is the correct weight for a 19 year old female that is around 5’5? And is there any way that I can gain weight? I’ve been 111 for the past three years, and no matter how much I eat, I can’t gain weight. I either stay the same, or lose it. Im four pounds underweight to donate blood but I really want too and I was just wondering what you’re supposed to weigh at my age.

The Expert answers:

First of all is it AWESOME that you want to donate blood. Hooray for you. You are within a healthy weight range for your height and age. You can go to this website which shows healthy body mass index for you. Http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi

I wouldn’t worry about trying to gain weight unless you really feel you are too thin, then the best way to do it is to start lifting weights. You won’t beef up or start to look like a man I promise. But you will build muscle which weighs more than any other tissue and can gain a few “healthy” pounds this way.

Susan asks…

What is the mathematical formula for retrograde extrapolation?

The Expert answers:

The mathematical method propounded by Professor Dr EMP Widmark [1, 2] for estimation of blood alcohol levels from consumption and vice versa has proven robust and continues in general use after the passage of more than seventy years, despite the development of other, arguably more exact, approaches such as that of Watson [3].

Widmark’s “reduced body mass,” or “r” value represents that proportion of the body available for the distribution of alcohol, and is an important part of the calculation. The average “r” values reported by Widmark (male average 0.68, standard deviation 0.085; female average 0.55, standard deviation 0.055) are often used as defaults, but they are open to question on several grounds:

They are based on very small series (20 men and 10 women), so significant statistical variation due to non-random selection is quite possible;
Widmark did not claim that the range of values in his subjects was representative of humans in general; and
Several more modern studies report higher average figures, although the observed ranges generally overlap Widmark’s experimental results [4, 5].
It is an inconvenient fact that the specific Widmark “r” value for an individual can be known with certainty only by experiment, and furthermore that it can change with the passage of time. It is possible, however, to make a reasonable estimate of the “r” value at the time of interest; several methods have been proposed for this. Notable among such methods is that of Forrest [6], which is based upon the Body Mass Index (BMI; weight divided by height squared).

Sandy asks…

How can a weak, skinny girl get in shape?

I’m 14, 5 foot and about 83 lb. I want to get in shape, but I can’t afford to lose weight, I’m already way too thin. However, all the lose no weight yet get buff regimes are things like chin-ups, when to this day I can’t crank out one push-up. How can I get in shape?

The Expert answers:

You do need daily exercise which is necessary to prevent heart disease and, especially for females, to prevent them getting osteoporosis – brittle bone disease – in later life, and to keep you fit and healthy. I suggest you attend an aerobics class to build up your fitness. It concentrates on suppleness, not strength.
You also need to eat fruit or drink fruit juice in between meals to keep your Glycemic Index at a constant level (keep topping up the tank) – hence the 5 a day mantra. This is your blood sugar (glucose) level and provides your energy.
To diet and control weight properly needs some science behind it.
When you eat is just as important as what you eat. Chocolate is best eaten in the morning when you can burn off the calories it gives. If eaten at night when there is likely to be no exercise before going to bed, it will end up as white fat and increase your weight but do it unhealthily. Alcohol consumption is the same and it is best to avoid alcohol if on a diet. Carbohydrates like potatoes and bread are fuels, but will convert to white fat if not used – and this is likely if eaten late of an evening.
Although energetic sports will help you to lose weight, moderate exercise alone will not. The weight loss is usually water which is soon replaced, and it doesn’t burn as many calories as people think. A moderately-loaded exercise cycle ridden at 30 mph only burns around 3 calories per minute and uses 5.6 calories/mile. These figures are not erroneous. As a check: the average 25 year old 5’4” tall woman who weighs 120 lbs. And has a moderately active lifestyle will need 1900 calories all day.(1 day=1440 minutes) That is an average of 1.33 calories/min. The average 25 year old 5’8” tall man who weighs 140 lbs. And has a moderately active lifestyle will need 2280 calories all day. That is an average of 1.6 calories/min.
As someone who has been on a diet and keep fit regime for seven years, my advice is to treat diet as the way to control your weight and leave exercise for keeping fit – you can then forget about calories and just enjoy the exercise. You need to separate the two in your mind.
There are two things you need to know about weight control. The first is how many calories you will need per day.
You are using energy even when you are asleep. BMR is your Basal Metabolic Rate, which is the number of calories you’d burn if you stayed in bed all day. Strangely, if you try a starvation diet to lose weight it will decrease your BMR, making it harder to lose weight and so is counter-productive. BMR decreases with age, making it harder to lose weight as you age but cardiovascular exercises can increase it. I have calculated it for you and it is 1232.25. Now you multiply it by a factor which depends upon how much physical activity you will do in the day. It ranges from 1.2 (sedentary) to 1.9 (very active). This will give you the number of calories you will need.
The second is an assessment of your weight.
For that you need know your Body Mass Index, which is the clinical figure that determines if you are under-, normal-, or overweight. In your case it is 16.2 and the normal range is 18.5 – 24.9, which equates to 95 lbs. – 128 lbs. At your height, so you are quite underweight and need to gain 14 lbs. To put you in the normal range.
If you live in the UK I suggest you contact your local NHS office and speak to a Health Trainer. Knowing your BMR and your BMI will let them give you diet and fitness advice which will help you achieve your objective. They’re the experts and their service is free.
If you live in the US ask the equivalent people at your local Medical Center.

Sharon asks…

Wat is the average weight for a 5’6 athletic 14 yr old girl?

Im 14 and i weigh 120 and im pretty sure its mostly muscle but idk and where is the best place to get pants if ur this body type cause i go to hollister and stuff and i have to wear a size 6 and the butt doesnt rly fit. Thanks!
I have the same problem with ae they fit me around the waste but not around my butt its all loose its so annoyin!

The Expert answers:

That’s average for athletic girl your height and age
http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/
(body mass index (BMI) is a measure of body fat based on
height and weight that applies to both adult men and women)
you can go to that site and calculate your bmi,
and see if your normal

hm, I’m 5’4 and I’m a cheerleader, i was in rugby
I’m very athletic, I’m 15 turning 16
anyways, i shop at American eagle
there jeans are so comfortable
blue-notes has cheep nice jeans,
hollister, i never bought jeans there before, so i don’t
know what there like
old navy has nice jeans but there sizes are screwed up i find
also, west 49 has nice jeans, but there really long
where I’m short i have a lot of extra jean room at the bottom
where your taller you may not have that problem

Lisa asks…

From a non-biast point of veiw, is Creatine dangerous? Has it been scientifically prooved that it works?

I have been taking Amplified Creatine 189 for a couple months. I belive that is is working wonderfully. Can results be different for certain people? Has this product been clinically proven to work?

The Expert answers:

Creatine is often taken by athletes as a supplement for those wishing to gain muscle mass (bodybuilding). There are a number of forms but the most common are creatine monohydrate – creatine complexed with a molecule of water, and Creatine ethyl ester (CEE). A number of methods for ingestion exist – as a powder mixed into a drink, or as a capsule or caplet. Once ingested, creatine is highly bioavailable, whether it is ingested as the crystalline monohydrate form, the free form in solution, or even in meat. Creatine salts will become the free form when dissolved in aqueous solution. Conventional wisdom recommends the consumption of creatine with high glycemic index carbohydrates, though research indicates that the use of high GI carbs in combination with protein is also beneficial.[5]

There is scientific evidence that taking creatine supplements can marginally increase athletic performance in high-intensity anaerobic repetitive cycling sprints, but studies in swimmers and runners have been less than promising, most likely because these activities are sustained at a given intensity and thus do not allow for significant intra-exercise synthesis of additional creatine phosphate molecules. Ingesting creatine can increase the level of phosphocreatine in the muscles up to 20%. It must be noted creatine has no significant effect on aerobic endurance, though it will increase power during aerobic exercise.[6]

Since body mass gains of about 1 kg can occur in a week’s time, many studies suggest that the gain is simply due to greater water retention inside the muscle cells. However, studies into the long-term effect of creatine supplementation suggest that body mass gains cannot be explained by increases in intracellular water alone.[7] In the longer term, the increase in total body water is reported to be proportional to the weight gains, which means that the percentage of total body water is not significantly changed. The magnitude of the weight gains during training over a period of several weeks argue against the water-retention theory.

Also, research has shown that creatine increases the activity of satellite cells, which make muscle hypertrophy possible. Creatine supplementation appears to increase the number of myonuclei that satellite cells will ‘donate’ to damaged muscle fibers, which increases the potential for growth of those fibers. This increase in myonuclei probably stems from creatine’s ability to increase levels of the myogenic transcription factor MRF4.[8][9].

In another study, researchers concluded that changes in substrate oxidation may influence the inhibition of fat mass loss associated with creatine after weight training when they discovered that fat mass did not change significantly with creatine but decreased after the placebo trial in a 12-week study on ten active men. The study also showed that 1-RM bench press and total body mass increased after creatine, but not after placebo.[10] The underlying effect of Creatine on body composition if there is indeed one has yet to be determined, as another study with a similar timeframe suggests no effect on body composition, but had less overall emphasis on metabolic effects. [11]

Creatine use is not considered doping and is not banned by the majority of sport-governing bodies. However, in the United States, the NCAA recently ruled that colleges could not provide creatine supplements to their players, though the players are still allowed to obtain and use creatine independently.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Your Questions About Fitness

Donald asks…

How much am I supposed to weigh?

What is the correct weight for a 19 year old female that is around 5’5? And is there any way that I can gain weight? I’ve been 111 for the past three years, and no matter how much I eat, I can’t gain weight. I either stay the same, or lose it. Im four pounds underweight to donate blood but I really want too and I was just wondering what you’re supposed to weigh at my age.

The Expert answers:

First of all is it AWESOME that you want to donate blood. Hooray for you. You are within a healthy weight range for your height and age. You can go to this website which shows healthy body mass index for you. Http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi

I wouldn’t worry about trying to gain weight unless you really feel you are too thin, then the best way to do it is to start lifting weights. You won’t beef up or start to look like a man I promise. But you will build muscle which weighs more than any other tissue and can gain a few “healthy” pounds this way.

Linda asks…

What is the mathematical formula for retrograde extrapolation?

The Expert answers:

The mathematical method propounded by Professor Dr EMP Widmark [1, 2] for estimation of blood alcohol levels from consumption and vice versa has proven robust and continues in general use after the passage of more than seventy years, despite the development of other, arguably more exact, approaches such as that of Watson [3].

Widmark’s “reduced body mass,” or “r” value represents that proportion of the body available for the distribution of alcohol, and is an important part of the calculation. The average “r” values reported by Widmark (male average 0.68, standard deviation 0.085; female average 0.55, standard deviation 0.055) are often used as defaults, but they are open to question on several grounds:

They are based on very small series (20 men and 10 women), so significant statistical variation due to non-random selection is quite possible;
Widmark did not claim that the range of values in his subjects was representative of humans in general; and
Several more modern studies report higher average figures, although the observed ranges generally overlap Widmark’s experimental results [4, 5].
It is an inconvenient fact that the specific Widmark “r” value for an individual can be known with certainty only by experiment, and furthermore that it can change with the passage of time. It is possible, however, to make a reasonable estimate of the “r” value at the time of interest; several methods have been proposed for this. Notable among such methods is that of Forrest [6], which is based upon the Body Mass Index (BMI; weight divided by height squared).

Sandy asks…

How can a weak, skinny girl get in shape?

I’m 14, 5 foot and about 83 lb. I want to get in shape, but I can’t afford to lose weight, I’m already way too thin. However, all the lose no weight yet get buff regimes are things like chin-ups, when to this day I can’t crank out one push-up. How can I get in shape?

The Expert answers:

You do need daily exercise which is necessary to prevent heart disease and, especially for females, to prevent them getting osteoporosis – brittle bone disease – in later life, and to keep you fit and healthy. I suggest you attend an aerobics class to build up your fitness. It concentrates on suppleness, not strength.
You also need to eat fruit or drink fruit juice in between meals to keep your Glycemic Index at a constant level (keep topping up the tank) – hence the 5 a day mantra. This is your blood sugar (glucose) level and provides your energy.
To diet and control weight properly needs some science behind it.
When you eat is just as important as what you eat. Chocolate is best eaten in the morning when you can burn off the calories it gives. If eaten at night when there is likely to be no exercise before going to bed, it will end up as white fat and increase your weight but do it unhealthily. Alcohol consumption is the same and it is best to avoid alcohol if on a diet. Carbohydrates like potatoes and bread are fuels, but will convert to white fat if not used – and this is likely if eaten late of an evening.
Although energetic sports will help you to lose weight, moderate exercise alone will not. The weight loss is usually water which is soon replaced, and it doesn’t burn as many calories as people think. A moderately-loaded exercise cycle ridden at 30 mph only burns around 3 calories per minute and uses 5.6 calories/mile. These figures are not erroneous. As a check: the average 25 year old 5’4” tall woman who weighs 120 lbs. And has a moderately active lifestyle will need 1900 calories all day.(1 day=1440 minutes) That is an average of 1.33 calories/min. The average 25 year old 5’8” tall man who weighs 140 lbs. And has a moderately active lifestyle will need 2280 calories all day. That is an average of 1.6 calories/min.
As someone who has been on a diet and keep fit regime for seven years, my advice is to treat diet as the way to control your weight and leave exercise for keeping fit – you can then forget about calories and just enjoy the exercise. You need to separate the two in your mind.
There are two things you need to know about weight control. The first is how many calories you will need per day.
You are using energy even when you are asleep. BMR is your Basal Metabolic Rate, which is the number of calories you’d burn if you stayed in bed all day. Strangely, if you try a starvation diet to lose weight it will decrease your BMR, making it harder to lose weight and so is counter-productive. BMR decreases with age, making it harder to lose weight as you age but cardiovascular exercises can increase it. I have calculated it for you and it is 1232.25. Now you multiply it by a factor which depends upon how much physical activity you will do in the day. It ranges from 1.2 (sedentary) to 1.9 (very active). This will give you the number of calories you will need.
The second is an assessment of your weight.
For that you need know your Body Mass Index, which is the clinical figure that determines if you are under-, normal-, or overweight. In your case it is 16.2 and the normal range is 18.5 – 24.9, which equates to 95 lbs. – 128 lbs. At your height, so you are quite underweight and need to gain 14 lbs. To put you in the normal range.
If you live in the UK I suggest you contact your local NHS office and speak to a Health Trainer. Knowing your BMR and your BMI will let them give you diet and fitness advice which will help you achieve your objective. They’re the experts and their service is free.
If you live in the US ask the equivalent people at your local Medical Center.

Richard asks…

Wat is the average weight for a 5’6 athletic 14 yr old girl?

Im 14 and i weigh 120 and im pretty sure its mostly muscle but idk and where is the best place to get pants if ur this body type cause i go to hollister and stuff and i have to wear a size 6 and the butt doesnt rly fit. Thanks!
I have the same problem with ae they fit me around the waste but not around my butt its all loose its so annoyin!

The Expert answers:

That’s average for athletic girl your height and age
http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/
(body mass index (BMI) is a measure of body fat based on
height and weight that applies to both adult men and women)
you can go to that site and calculate your bmi,
and see if your normal

hm, I’m 5’4 and I’m a cheerleader, i was in rugby
I’m very athletic, I’m 15 turning 16
anyways, i shop at American eagle
there jeans are so comfortable
blue-notes has cheep nice jeans,
hollister, i never bought jeans there before, so i don’t
know what there like
old navy has nice jeans but there sizes are screwed up i find
also, west 49 has nice jeans, but there really long
where I’m short i have a lot of extra jean room at the bottom
where your taller you may not have that problem

John asks…

From a non-biast point of veiw, is Creatine dangerous? Has it been scientifically prooved that it works?

I have been taking Amplified Creatine 189 for a couple months. I belive that is is working wonderfully. Can results be different for certain people? Has this product been clinically proven to work?

The Expert answers:

Creatine is often taken by athletes as a supplement for those wishing to gain muscle mass (bodybuilding). There are a number of forms but the most common are creatine monohydrate – creatine complexed with a molecule of water, and Creatine ethyl ester (CEE). A number of methods for ingestion exist – as a powder mixed into a drink, or as a capsule or caplet. Once ingested, creatine is highly bioavailable, whether it is ingested as the crystalline monohydrate form, the free form in solution, or even in meat. Creatine salts will become the free form when dissolved in aqueous solution. Conventional wisdom recommends the consumption of creatine with high glycemic index carbohydrates, though research indicates that the use of high GI carbs in combination with protein is also beneficial.[5]

There is scientific evidence that taking creatine supplements can marginally increase athletic performance in high-intensity anaerobic repetitive cycling sprints, but studies in swimmers and runners have been less than promising, most likely because these activities are sustained at a given intensity and thus do not allow for significant intra-exercise synthesis of additional creatine phosphate molecules. Ingesting creatine can increase the level of phosphocreatine in the muscles up to 20%. It must be noted creatine has no significant effect on aerobic endurance, though it will increase power during aerobic exercise.[6]

Since body mass gains of about 1 kg can occur in a week’s time, many studies suggest that the gain is simply due to greater water retention inside the muscle cells. However, studies into the long-term effect of creatine supplementation suggest that body mass gains cannot be explained by increases in intracellular water alone.[7] In the longer term, the increase in total body water is reported to be proportional to the weight gains, which means that the percentage of total body water is not significantly changed. The magnitude of the weight gains during training over a period of several weeks argue against the water-retention theory.

Also, research has shown that creatine increases the activity of satellite cells, which make muscle hypertrophy possible. Creatine supplementation appears to increase the number of myonuclei that satellite cells will ‘donate’ to damaged muscle fibers, which increases the potential for growth of those fibers. This increase in myonuclei probably stems from creatine’s ability to increase levels of the myogenic transcription factor MRF4.[8][9].

In another study, researchers concluded that changes in substrate oxidation may influence the inhibition of fat mass loss associated with creatine after weight training when they discovered that fat mass did not change significantly with creatine but decreased after the placebo trial in a 12-week study on ten active men. The study also showed that 1-RM bench press and total body mass increased after creatine, but not after placebo.[10] The underlying effect of Creatine on body composition if there is indeed one has yet to be determined, as another study with a similar timeframe suggests no effect on body composition, but had less overall emphasis on metabolic effects. [11]

Creatine use is not considered doping and is not banned by the majority of sport-governing bodies. However, in the United States, the NCAA recently ruled that colleges could not provide creatine supplements to their players, though the players are still allowed to obtain and use creatine independently.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Your Questions About Fitness

John asks…

How much am I supposed to weigh?

What is the correct weight for a 19 year old female that is around 5’5? And is there any way that I can gain weight? I’ve been 111 for the past three years, and no matter how much I eat, I can’t gain weight. I either stay the same, or lose it. Im four pounds underweight to donate blood but I really want too and I was just wondering what you’re supposed to weigh at my age.

The Expert answers:

First of all is it AWESOME that you want to donate blood. Hooray for you. You are within a healthy weight range for your height and age. You can go to this website which shows healthy body mass index for you. Http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi

I wouldn’t worry about trying to gain weight unless you really feel you are too thin, then the best way to do it is to start lifting weights. You won’t beef up or start to look like a man I promise. But you will build muscle which weighs more than any other tissue and can gain a few “healthy” pounds this way.

Sharon asks…

What is the mathematical formula for retrograde extrapolation?

The Expert answers:

The mathematical method propounded by Professor Dr EMP Widmark [1, 2] for estimation of blood alcohol levels from consumption and vice versa has proven robust and continues in general use after the passage of more than seventy years, despite the development of other, arguably more exact, approaches such as that of Watson [3].

Widmark’s “reduced body mass,” or “r” value represents that proportion of the body available for the distribution of alcohol, and is an important part of the calculation. The average “r” values reported by Widmark (male average 0.68, standard deviation 0.085; female average 0.55, standard deviation 0.055) are often used as defaults, but they are open to question on several grounds:

They are based on very small series (20 men and 10 women), so significant statistical variation due to non-random selection is quite possible;
Widmark did not claim that the range of values in his subjects was representative of humans in general; and
Several more modern studies report higher average figures, although the observed ranges generally overlap Widmark’s experimental results [4, 5].
It is an inconvenient fact that the specific Widmark “r” value for an individual can be known with certainty only by experiment, and furthermore that it can change with the passage of time. It is possible, however, to make a reasonable estimate of the “r” value at the time of interest; several methods have been proposed for this. Notable among such methods is that of Forrest [6], which is based upon the Body Mass Index (BMI; weight divided by height squared).

Maria asks…

How can a weak, skinny girl get in shape?

I’m 14, 5 foot and about 83 lb. I want to get in shape, but I can’t afford to lose weight, I’m already way too thin. However, all the lose no weight yet get buff regimes are things like chin-ups, when to this day I can’t crank out one push-up. How can I get in shape?

The Expert answers:

You do need daily exercise which is necessary to prevent heart disease and, especially for females, to prevent them getting osteoporosis – brittle bone disease – in later life, and to keep you fit and healthy. I suggest you attend an aerobics class to build up your fitness. It concentrates on suppleness, not strength.
You also need to eat fruit or drink fruit juice in between meals to keep your Glycemic Index at a constant level (keep topping up the tank) – hence the 5 a day mantra. This is your blood sugar (glucose) level and provides your energy.
To diet and control weight properly needs some science behind it.
When you eat is just as important as what you eat. Chocolate is best eaten in the morning when you can burn off the calories it gives. If eaten at night when there is likely to be no exercise before going to bed, it will end up as white fat and increase your weight but do it unhealthily. Alcohol consumption is the same and it is best to avoid alcohol if on a diet. Carbohydrates like potatoes and bread are fuels, but will convert to white fat if not used – and this is likely if eaten late of an evening.
Although energetic sports will help you to lose weight, moderate exercise alone will not. The weight loss is usually water which is soon replaced, and it doesn’t burn as many calories as people think. A moderately-loaded exercise cycle ridden at 30 mph only burns around 3 calories per minute and uses 5.6 calories/mile. These figures are not erroneous. As a check: the average 25 year old 5’4” tall woman who weighs 120 lbs. And has a moderately active lifestyle will need 1900 calories all day.(1 day=1440 minutes) That is an average of 1.33 calories/min. The average 25 year old 5’8” tall man who weighs 140 lbs. And has a moderately active lifestyle will need 2280 calories all day. That is an average of 1.6 calories/min.
As someone who has been on a diet and keep fit regime for seven years, my advice is to treat diet as the way to control your weight and leave exercise for keeping fit – you can then forget about calories and just enjoy the exercise. You need to separate the two in your mind.
There are two things you need to know about weight control. The first is how many calories you will need per day.
You are using energy even when you are asleep. BMR is your Basal Metabolic Rate, which is the number of calories you’d burn if you stayed in bed all day. Strangely, if you try a starvation diet to lose weight it will decrease your BMR, making it harder to lose weight and so is counter-productive. BMR decreases with age, making it harder to lose weight as you age but cardiovascular exercises can increase it. I have calculated it for you and it is 1232.25. Now you multiply it by a factor which depends upon how much physical activity you will do in the day. It ranges from 1.2 (sedentary) to 1.9 (very active). This will give you the number of calories you will need.
The second is an assessment of your weight.
For that you need know your Body Mass Index, which is the clinical figure that determines if you are under-, normal-, or overweight. In your case it is 16.2 and the normal range is 18.5 – 24.9, which equates to 95 lbs. – 128 lbs. At your height, so you are quite underweight and need to gain 14 lbs. To put you in the normal range.
If you live in the UK I suggest you contact your local NHS office and speak to a Health Trainer. Knowing your BMR and your BMI will let them give you diet and fitness advice which will help you achieve your objective. They’re the experts and their service is free.
If you live in the US ask the equivalent people at your local Medical Center.

Susan asks…

Wat is the average weight for a 5’6 athletic 14 yr old girl?

Im 14 and i weigh 120 and im pretty sure its mostly muscle but idk and where is the best place to get pants if ur this body type cause i go to hollister and stuff and i have to wear a size 6 and the butt doesnt rly fit. Thanks!
I have the same problem with ae they fit me around the waste but not around my butt its all loose its so annoyin!

The Expert answers:

That’s average for athletic girl your height and age
http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/
(body mass index (BMI) is a measure of body fat based on
height and weight that applies to both adult men and women)
you can go to that site and calculate your bmi,
and see if your normal

hm, I’m 5’4 and I’m a cheerleader, i was in rugby
I’m very athletic, I’m 15 turning 16
anyways, i shop at American eagle
there jeans are so comfortable
blue-notes has cheep nice jeans,
hollister, i never bought jeans there before, so i don’t
know what there like
old navy has nice jeans but there sizes are screwed up i find
also, west 49 has nice jeans, but there really long
where I’m short i have a lot of extra jean room at the bottom
where your taller you may not have that problem

Mark asks…

From a non-biast point of veiw, is Creatine dangerous? Has it been scientifically prooved that it works?

I have been taking Amplified Creatine 189 for a couple months. I belive that is is working wonderfully. Can results be different for certain people? Has this product been clinically proven to work?

The Expert answers:

Creatine is often taken by athletes as a supplement for those wishing to gain muscle mass (bodybuilding). There are a number of forms but the most common are creatine monohydrate – creatine complexed with a molecule of water, and Creatine ethyl ester (CEE). A number of methods for ingestion exist – as a powder mixed into a drink, or as a capsule or caplet. Once ingested, creatine is highly bioavailable, whether it is ingested as the crystalline monohydrate form, the free form in solution, or even in meat. Creatine salts will become the free form when dissolved in aqueous solution. Conventional wisdom recommends the consumption of creatine with high glycemic index carbohydrates, though research indicates that the use of high GI carbs in combination with protein is also beneficial.[5]

There is scientific evidence that taking creatine supplements can marginally increase athletic performance in high-intensity anaerobic repetitive cycling sprints, but studies in swimmers and runners have been less than promising, most likely because these activities are sustained at a given intensity and thus do not allow for significant intra-exercise synthesis of additional creatine phosphate molecules. Ingesting creatine can increase the level of phosphocreatine in the muscles up to 20%. It must be noted creatine has no significant effect on aerobic endurance, though it will increase power during aerobic exercise.[6]

Since body mass gains of about 1 kg can occur in a week’s time, many studies suggest that the gain is simply due to greater water retention inside the muscle cells. However, studies into the long-term effect of creatine supplementation suggest that body mass gains cannot be explained by increases in intracellular water alone.[7] In the longer term, the increase in total body water is reported to be proportional to the weight gains, which means that the percentage of total body water is not significantly changed. The magnitude of the weight gains during training over a period of several weeks argue against the water-retention theory.

Also, research has shown that creatine increases the activity of satellite cells, which make muscle hypertrophy possible. Creatine supplementation appears to increase the number of myonuclei that satellite cells will ‘donate’ to damaged muscle fibers, which increases the potential for growth of those fibers. This increase in myonuclei probably stems from creatine’s ability to increase levels of the myogenic transcription factor MRF4.[8][9].

In another study, researchers concluded that changes in substrate oxidation may influence the inhibition of fat mass loss associated with creatine after weight training when they discovered that fat mass did not change significantly with creatine but decreased after the placebo trial in a 12-week study on ten active men. The study also showed that 1-RM bench press and total body mass increased after creatine, but not after placebo.[10] The underlying effect of Creatine on body composition if there is indeed one has yet to be determined, as another study with a similar timeframe suggests no effect on body composition, but had less overall emphasis on metabolic effects. [11]

Creatine use is not considered doping and is not banned by the majority of sport-governing bodies. However, in the United States, the NCAA recently ruled that colleges could not provide creatine supplements to their players, though the players are still allowed to obtain and use creatine independently.

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